dating site

You’ve got 24 hours, and you get the first word – no pressure, right? Bumble breaks down the unspoken rule of dating where we wait to be approached – ball’s officially in your court here. Try asking everyone the same three questions if you want to see how they all measure up, treating it like a job interview or go for a tried and tested ‘drinks Thursday?’ if you’re feeling bold.

If you want to join Raya, be prepared to do a little legwork. After downloading the app, you need to complete an application and have a referral from a current member. Your application is then assessed by certain algorithmic values before being evaluated by an anonymous committee. The entire process can take anywhere from several weeks from several months, and once you’re approved there’s also a monthly membership fee of $8.


One of the better-known gay and lesbian dating apps, HER is a top option for queer women (and womxn) seeking a Tinder-style dating app that's exclusively focused on the LGBTQI+ experience. In its previous incarnation, it was known as Dattch; as HER the app's aim is to be a more-inclusive queer dating hub. Yet, with initial matching based on liking photos from a grid of nearby users, those seeking a serious relationship will have to be ok with asking questions to see if there's a personality connection.8
Matching with potential profiles is quick and streamlined—which is good if you’re a busy parent. If there is one thing that is missing from the matching experience, however, it’s learning about your potential match’s children or family situation. This isn’t always something you’d look for in an app, but when the site is geared toward single parents, it’s an important factor.
^ Madden, Mary; Lenhart, Amanda (September 2005). "Online Dating: Americans who are seeking romance use the internet to help them in their search, but there is still widespread public concern about the safety of online dating". Pew Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved 2010-12-08. Online daters tend to identify with more liberal social attitudes, compared with all Americans or all internet users.
I was actually happy to see that OKCupid took some time to make sure people that sign up are serious about dating. Along with you having to fill out your basic profile questions, like age, education, hobbies, sexual orientation and all that, it takes you through a ride of, yup, you guessed it…..Personality test questions. It’s not nearly as painful and tiresome as eHarmony, and it is optional and multiple-choice based, but it can take some time. More on this in a minute.
Bumble looks eerily similar to Tinder, but functions a tad differently. The big catch with Bumble is that when opposite genders match, the woman must message the guy first — and she has 24 hours to do so. Guys can extend matches for 24 hours, if they’re really hoping to hear from a woman, as can ladies, if they want to initiate something with a match but just haven’t had the time during the first day. For same-gender matches, either person can initiate the conversation first.
At Top Ten Reviews, we’ve been reviewing online dating services for the past fifteen years, watching them evolve and change with the times. Many people now prefer to use dating apps on their phones, rather than dating sites on their home computers. In fact some of the dating apps we reviewed only work with an Apple or Android smartphone or tablet. Most of the best dating sites in our list offer both, though.
So given the evidence, and the fact that it’s totally okay to think dating online sucks and still do it anyway, I wanted to know: Which apps come most recommended by people who fuckin’ hate to date? Which tech have daters made peace with, and why? Some of their answers won’t surprise you—even if their reasoning does—while other options are refreshingly new.

You can only add photos of yourself from Facebook or Instagram, though, which is kind of limiting if you’re not very active on either. Also, while the friends-of-friends concept has a lot of benefits, it’s also restricting. It’s possible to run out of matches after 10 minutes of browsing, which is a letdown if you’re actually enjoying the app or are serious about finding a date.
as of 2012[37] 1,999[38] for named portal; also 3-5% of mail.ru (#31) and rambler.ru (#191), which offer access to the same services and communication with the entire user pool through love.mail.ru and love.rambler.ru subdomains Free: communication, profile and picture views, simpler engine, blogs Yes: Premium content like additional search criteria and double appearances in others' relevant searches for "VIP membership". Single payments for regional advertising of profile (one-time appearance in scrolling banner for $1 – user picture, link, short text for mouseover; bidding war for stationary second banner + cost of $1/minute). Yes ? Free
Why? I am 39 and I know how hard it is to meet people. The reason I prefer Tinder is mainly due to volume. You will find more people on there than any other app or site, at least in my city. Tinder is also great when traveling. I’ve made some romantic connections as well as friends that I still communicate with. I have used Bumble, OKCupid, and Hinge and I found myself deleting these apps after a month.
Tinder was the first ‘swiping’ app to launch back in 2012. Today, the idea of swiping ‘left for no’ and ‘right for yes’ has become something of a cultural phenomenon (which could be why Tinder is the go-to app for many love-seekers). The app focuses on your location using GPS and you browse photos and bios of potential matches in your area. It uses your Facebook info to create your profile – but don’t worry, none of your Tinder exploits will ever be posted to Facebook.
Why? I met my now-fiancé on Bumble. I liked that I had the power to choose who I talked to. I was tired of getting cornered by creepy men at bars who wouldn't take a hint, but I was too nice to just walk away. (In hindsight, I should have!) Bumble allowed me to never feel obligated to talk to anyone just because they initiated a conversation with me.

Before we get started, our blanket recommendation for everyone is to find the apps with a larger user base in your area. That helps ensure you get plenty of matches, and by extension, a higher chance of finding someone actually compatible with you. If you try one of the niche apps and don’t get results after a week or two, we recommend ditching it entirely for a more popular option. If all else fails, our best recommendation is Tinder because, as stated, it’s popular everywhere. Good luck!
Sharon Kroll and fiancé Lee Wallender are the Seattle-based writers and dating experts behind The Dating Gurus. Kroll said it’s easy to get lost in the sea of possibilities when online dating so it’s important to limit the number of sites you’re onto to three and make sure you’re not spending all day checking them. It’s also important to make the first message you send count.
You can even say we're living through a worldwide Introvert Revolution. Just look at the success of self-proclaimed introvert Susan Cain's wildly popular book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. Her book has sold millions of copies worldwide, a TEDtalk she gave on the topic has been viewed over 19,294,447 times and counting, and she reportedly gets paid five-figures for a single appearance. 
Femininities, too, have shifted somewhat as expectations of women have changed over time. Women are more or less fully integrated into the workforce in Westernized countries such as Canada (though wages and workplace experiences still differ), and they have moved into more and different areas of public and economic life. However, women are still expected to exhibit some level of “delicacy,” and “assertiveness is [still] not part of the dominant female gender script” (Eckert & McConnell-Ginet, 2003, p. 49)—as most female politicians can attest . In pursuing intimate relationships, women are expected not to be too “forward” or (be seen to) give up sex too easily or to use sexualized language, because “female sexual behaviour translates as ‘loose’ and ‘unfeminine’ behaviour” (Paasonen, 2007, p. 50). Widely available cultural “scripts” for romance tend to reflect a deeply embedded heteronormativity, one that reinforces for women the notion that life is not complete without a romantic relationship (with a man) (Paasonen, 2007).

At Top Ten Reviews, we’ve been reviewing online dating services for the past fifteen years, watching them evolve and change with the times. Many people now prefer to use dating apps on their phones, rather than dating sites on their home computers. In fact some of the dating apps we reviewed only work with an Apple or Android smartphone or tablet. Most of the best dating sites in our list offer both, though.
This list of top dating sites includes broad focus companies like OKCupid, Match.com, PlentyofFish, and eHarmony. You can also vote for your favorite matchmaking for more specific demographics. Which of these websites has the best potential dates? Which have the best algorithms for matching people with your same interests? Which have the most relationship success stories? Vote up the best online dating sites, and add any that we missed.
Hinge focuses on common connections that you and a potential partner share on Facebook. Which is great if you trust the judgment of your friends and family. Of course, some of us are trying to meet new people, far removed from our everyday lives. (Hinge may have gotten the hint, since you no longer need Facebook to sign up.) The app also asks questions to help you match with better connections, which can be a plus for serious relationship seekers. 
Why? It's the original “I don’t have the time to waste energy on people who don't find me physically attractive” app. I also believe people go on the app without a set idea of what they want overall, so the idea of a date and one-nighter is attractive and effortless. But that doesn’t mean everyone is opposed to relationships of growing from the first encounter.
We created three made-up online dating profiles and spent five days trying out each service and monitoring the responses our fake profiles received. We created a woman seeking a man, a man seeking a woman and a woman seeking a woman to make sure our data was well-rounded. All three profiles were similarly generic: They were white with bachelor’s degrees with low to midrange full-time jobs. To create these accounts we had to make fake email accounts and, for some sites, fake Facebook accounts and phone numbers as well.
Femininities, too, have shifted somewhat as expectations of women have changed over time. Women are more or less fully integrated into the workforce in Westernized countries such as Canada (though wages and workplace experiences still differ), and they have moved into more and different areas of public and economic life. However, women are still expected to exhibit some level of “delicacy,” and “assertiveness is [still] not part of the dominant female gender script” (Eckert & McConnell-Ginet, 2003, p. 49)—as most female politicians can attest . In pursuing intimate relationships, women are expected not to be too “forward” or (be seen to) give up sex too easily or to use sexualized language, because “female sexual behaviour translates as ‘loose’ and ‘unfeminine’ behaviour” (Paasonen, 2007, p. 50). Widely available cultural “scripts” for romance tend to reflect a deeply embedded heteronormativity, one that reinforces for women the notion that life is not complete without a romantic relationship (with a man) (Paasonen, 2007).

When we take a closer look at where Tinder is downloaded and who is spending, a few things stand out from the data. From a download perspective, the US is the place to go if you’re looking for love on Tinder, especially if you have an iPhone. While US users account for 25% of downloads on Android, they account for 34% of all iOS downloads. To put that into perspective, this puts the US download share 9% ahead of Tinder’s second largest market on Android (Brazil) and 26% ahead of it next largest iOS market (UK). This means American users have a much deeper pool of potential matches to choose from, giving them a greater chance of finding that special someone.


Discussing “which sports I play and watch” makes a distinction about lifestyle, fitness, health, and gender. Competitive sport is normatively gendered as masculine, and men are generally assumed to both watch and engage in more sporting activities (especially team sports) than females. For women, playing sports is more likely to be acceptable primarily as a form of exercise. In some of the profiles I analyzed, the position of references to sport and exercise in the first text box seemed to indicate its assumed importance to the profile’s author: “Sports is a bit of a blank spot, though I’m working on it, unless you count following English Premier League football”; “I love playing sports and hittin the gym.”
You can also adjust your age and distance preferences for who shows up on your “Meet”; however, you can’t change the city you are in with a free membership. You can only be given results in your area. The other premier feature is the “Feed”, which is like a Facebook or Instagram feed. You can see other people’s pictures and posts and comment on them or like them, or vice versa. This is another way of adding friends and communicating with others.
On the upside, the profiles are brief, which allows you to make decisions quickly. The downside is that short profiles make it harder to figure out what people are looking for. Knowing very little about a person can also make initial messaging more challenging. You'll need to wade through a sea of profiles, which makes it easy to pass over people you might have given a chance under different circumstances. 

Match.com has a free version, but the general consensus is that you'll need a paid subscription to have any luck. That's a hangover from the early days of online dating, when paying for membership to a site meant you were serious about settling down. But my friends and I have long since come to the conclusion that you might be a little too eager to find a significant other if you're paying to get dates, particularly given the abundance of free dating apps. There are definitely paid features on some dating apps that are worth the price, but I've yet to be able to justify shelling out cash for love. 
BiCupid is the best dating app for bisexual singles and Bi Cupid is dedicated to bisexual dating service only for bisexual and bi-curious. Here you can find other sexy and open-minded singles and couples who are looking to explore their sexuality, chat, hook up and more. BiCupid is not only the world’s first but also the best dating app of bisexual men, women, and couples in search of love and companionship. The bisexual dating app is catered towards bisexual singles and couples who are striving to establish a bond with open-minded individuals who are exploring sexuality and friendship. Full Review »
Even though it might feel like online dating is mostly about luck, academics have been studying it for some time now. In fact, the longer online dating continues to evolve the more information there is to study. Of the romantic partnerships formed in the United States between 2007 and 2009, 21 percent of heterosexual couples and 61 percent of same-sex couples met online, according to a study by Stanford sociology professor Michael J. Rosenfeld and reported by the New York Times. While this might make you feel like your online dating habits are on display, the fact that they’re being studied can actually be really helpful. For example, one 2018 study from the University of Michigan found the best way to start a  successful conversation is to simply say "hey." That same study found both men and women tend to aim high in online dating, messaging matches who were on average 25 percent more attractive than they were. If you feel like most of the people you match with don't end of looking like they do in their profile, there's science to back that up. A study of 80 online daters found two thirds of users lied about their weight by 5 pounds or more with no correlation to whether the user was male or female. Having this knowledge in your back pocket can be useful while scrolling through Tinder or eharmony and result in more matches and long term connections.

How does it work? A similar taste in music can be a great indicator as to whether you’re compatible with someone, so the fine folks behind Tastebuds have struck gold with their music-based online dating site. Getting started is dead simple: pick three artists or bands that you’re interested in, the gender you’re looking to date and press ‘go’. It’s a fun and relaxed site, which can introduce you to new music, concert buddies and potentially even your own real-life Caleb Followill.
No, we’re not kidding. You know those fancy new fridges that pair with a smartphone app to show you the contents of your fridge while you’re away from home? Now there’s a dating app that goes along with that, allowing you to find a mate based upon the contents of their fridge. Samsung's $3,000 Family Hub refrigerator now has a dating app, Refrigerdating, where you can browse user profiles with information not only about their personalities, but their fridges. The New York Times reported that's how creator John Stonehill met his wife of nine years; he perused the contents of her fridge the first chance he got. He helped develop the app for Samsung, which launched in early 2019.
For most sites, I’ll look for coupons for a free week or discounted rate. I couldn’t find any with Zoosk. And just like every dating site I review, a membership is not cheap. Face reality, folks: You have to spend some to date. The good news is it’s not on the more expensive scale like some of the other sites I’ve seen. You can always get a free membership that allows you to search for others; you just can’t message them.
In developing a working knowledge of the genre, users of online dating sites reference familiar rhetorical strategies from promotional forms such as advertising, public relations, and even job ads (e.g., Horning, 2007; Vitzthum, 2007). They also draw on other people’s profiles as available resources that provide models for appropriate style and content (Yurchisin, Watchravesringkan, & Brown McCabe, 2005). Although the “anonymity” of the Internet presents more potential for deception and misrepresentation, one’s online façade cannot be too far distant from the identity presented in “real life,” because there is always the possibility of meeting another user in person and being “found out,” then rejected (Gibbs, Ellison, & Heino, 2006; Whitty, 2007a).
outgoing, energetic, funny, intelligent, intense, compulsively honest, a little mischievous is how friends would describe me. … kind, bright, interesting, can cook and do and know all the neat things one is supposed to, but also, say what I mean—mean what I say, honour my word, … am affectionate, playful, … am more happy than not, and apparently am sexy to some people, and … a little bashful, a little old school. (F1-33)
A relevant text box was “Favourite item of clothing.” Many of the men in my sample did not complete this at all, and women were not particularly descriptive: “at the moment, my skinny jeans” (note the reference to body size); “bather”; “thigh-high boots”; and—more explicitly—“my really amazing black lace bra.” In spite of their brevity, these answers still seem to signify that site users are presenting their bodies in specific, gendered ways: the revelation that one wears women’s underwear is a choice that would no doubt seem out of place (to many heterosexual women) on a man’s profile. Pragmatics, rather than choice of object, could also reflect gendered differences—such as one interesting example in which two users (one male, one female) chose the same “favourite” item, shoes. While M8-27 picked “A good pair of shoes. Gotta have good shoes,” F9-30 showed more enthusiasm with “Shoes, shoes, shoes!” The “male” version of desire for shoes sounds like a practical choice, whereas the “female” version reflects enthusiasm for clothes and/or shopping.
One of the better-known gay and lesbian dating apps, HER is a top option for queer women (and womxn) seeking a Tinder-style dating app that's exclusively focused on the LGBTQI+ experience. In its previous incarnation, it was known as Dattch; as HER the app's aim is to be a more-inclusive queer dating hub. Yet, with initial matching based on liking photos from a grid of nearby users, those seeking a serious relationship will have to be ok with asking questions to see if there's a personality connection.8
The tone is simultaneously demanding and self-congratulatory, such that one almost wonders if the writer is being ironic. He implies that while he desires a certain level of independence and intelligence, “too much” makes a woman “a bitch,” though very good looks (“being considered a knockout”) are acceptable—particularly if she doesn’t have too high an opinion of herself.

In recent years, OKCupid has added some limits to the messaging service. In previous years, you could message anyone you want and that got the conversation rolling, kind of like Plenty of Fish. Today, while you are still free to message anyone you’d like, the other person will only see it and be able to respond if they liked you back. So this is why it’s very important to take filling out your profile seriously as it could keep many from liking you and, therefore, messaging you. It can be frustrating, though, to send out a lot of messages and wonder if they’re ever going to message you back. Chances are they never read your message because they never hit the “like” button.
Appearances can be deceiving, though. Although Coffee Meets Bagel allows for a range of super-specific preferences, the bagel it sends you may or may not match your specified preferences and, more often than not, if they do, they will be a significant distance away. The app can also be glitchy, often resulting in slow update and load times, and sometimes it’s frustrating that it sends you only a single bagel a day. You can speed things up a bit by using the “give & take” option, but it’ll cost you 385 beans to like someone who catches your eye.
Throughout the profiles, many references are made to specific places and to travelling, restaurants, leisure time, work, and so on; these generate associations. To allude to one’s lifestyle, including habits of consumption and “pace” of life, is to reference other kinds of choices and desires and ways of seeing oneself in the social world. Occupations and work are seen to signify something important about a person’s ambitions and goals.
A large dating site may not be the way to go if you have something specific you're looking for, especially if you're not willing to compromise on that thing. Masini recommends niche sites to people who want to be with someone with a particular lifestyle because it will save time and will match you with singles with similar values. Christian seeking Christians? Try ChristianMingle. Jew seeking Jew? JDate is one of the oldest niche dating sites on the web. Maybe you're just a dedicated bookworm looking for a kindred spirit. Give Alikewise a try.

Specify Relationship Type. One of the best features of PlentyofFish is that it allows you to specify exactly which type of relationship you’re looking for, from a hookup, to friends, to casual dating, to a long-term relationship, to marriage. The site matches you up based on a variety of factors, such as location, interests, and even your browsing history – this means that if you input that you are looking for someone in his or her 40s, but are browsing people in their 20s, both will show up as matches for you. 


@OttawaMorning Online Dating - my hubby & I met each other online through @eHarmonyCanada . He was just finishing his 3 month membership, I joined for 1 yr and met him in the 1st 3 weeks. LOL. We've known each other 10 years, married for 8. pic.twitter.com/PfC1EGuYs3
There’s also a section where you can put your prayer of the day and share it with others. You also have the ability to see who is online and who viewed your profile. There is also a gift shop if you want to buy a user a premium membership. Might be worth it if you want them to message you; hopefully they will or that gift will be wasted. Lastly, they have dating advice from the site itself and veteran members as well as testimonials from those who met on Christian Café and are still together today.

If the thought of signing up for an online dating service without any help is scary, you can hire a ghostwriter to help you out. You might have even encountered some of these ghostwriters yourself and not have known it. Essentially, writers are paid to build your profile in a way that’s pleasing and more likely to get you dates. Thrillist even profiled an online dating ghostwriter who took details submitted by would-be daters and turned them into dating bios and even conversation starters. If this sounds like something you would benefit from, there are numerous services you can sign up for. 


Julia* lives in Maine and, though she says she’s had the most success meeting people via Bumble, kept Tinder for her work trips. “I’ve held onto Tinder because it’s used more internationally,” she says. “I used to travel abroad alone for work a lot and would just get super bored. I downloaded Tinder for the first time in Buenos Aires because I wanted to practice my Spanish. Even if I don’t go out with anyone, at the very least it’s entertaining to scope out people in foreign cities.”
Why it's awesome: Plenty of Fish, sometime styled as POF, boasts 4 million daily active users, with 65,000 new users each day, apparently, and claims users send 1 billion messages per month. After registering for POF, hopeful daters take a personality test that then helps POF determine what they call, "Your Relationship Needs." Basically, it's a way to make sure users know what they want from their love lives, and to ensure that it serves users other profiles that meet that criteria. One unusual quirk: The site recently launched a feature that allows users to message others through Google Home. Says Spira: "They have a large user base, are a free site, and are very popular."
How it works: Like a good wingman (or wing woman), Zoosk starts to understand you more and more as time goes on to help introduce you to the person you can spend the night or rest of your life with. The site's unique algorithm recognizes your preferences through the actions you take. The more you interact with the site, the better it can match you with your ideal human. 
Zoosk recommends showing your natural smile, citing a 2015 study that found people are drawn to a genuine show of pearly whites. That same study found people prefer a photo if the subject is tilting their head slightly, and if you're a woman seeking a man, make sure to incorporate the color red somewhere in your photo. If you really can't decide which photo to choose, don't be afraid to ask for a little outside help. A 2017 study found people tend to pick out less favorable photos of themselves when compared to letting others choose, so go ahead and ask your friends to help you!
Dating is frustrating, exciting, awkward, and funny as hell. But more than anything, it's a learning experience of what you like, don't like, and are willing to endure—and for that I'm grateful. And when all hope is lost with a date and you find yourself hiding in a bathroom, or completely zoning out, or ghosting, at least you've got a good story to tell.
I approach these questions through a discourse analysis of 20 dating profiles taken from a popular website, Nerve.com. I use gender theory and discourse analysis to show how identity is being constructed and projected as gendered in various ways by these individuals, looking to earlier studies of print and online dating advertisements, in particular Jagger (1998) and Coupland (1996), as a starting point for my analysis. I argue that due to long-term shifts in the way we signal our identities or identifications, and to changes in the format of the advertisements (from print to Internet “profiles”), gender identity is “indexed” primarily through references to other, lifestyle-affiliated categories as well as through more direct discursive cues. Examples discussed in my analysis include descriptions of one’s self and of one’s desired partner; signification of lifestyle through references to activities and practices, consumer items (such as food, technology), and culture (books, music, films); and implicating the state of one’s body through references to physical activity and appearance.
That being said,  services you pay for usually provide some extra user value to justify the price tag. There’s usually more advanced matching algorithms along with other bells and whistles, and because you must pay to use them, they tend to attract people who take online dating a little more seriously. Of course, many free sites have matching systems that work just as well as (if not better, in some cases) their paid competitors, and each dating website or app tends to have its own unique aspect that makes it stand out.
Our Time is yet another site originated by the creators of Match.com, so it is similar in style to that site, as well as Chemistry.com, and uses a matchmaking algorithm to generate matches based on your personality profile. However, like Match, you can choose your own matches, and it also allows searches for same-sex relationships. It costs $19.99 for a one-month subscription, $17.99 per month for a three-month subscription, and $11.99 per month for a six-month subscription.
Volume sites like Match.com are perfect for women who are interested in expanding their social circles and dating around. "Match.com is the big daddy of dating sites. It's sprawling, super established, and like a massive department store, it's got a department for everyone: millennials, seniors, single parents, people looking for fun, and those looking for something more serious like marriage," Masini says. Every day, the site sends users six matches based on compatibility, but it leaves much of the matching up to the user. Unlike the more formulaic dating sites, Match.com encourages users to spend their twenties dating as many people as possible to find what they like in a partner.
For women who know what they want out of a long-term partner, EliteSingles prides itself on its intelligent matchmaking algorithm. EliteSingles presents you matches based on your personal preferences and the Big Five Personality Traits: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism (sometimes called Emotional Stability). 
Tinder was the first ‘swiping’ app to launch back in 2012. Today, the idea of swiping ‘left for no’ and ‘right for yes’ has become something of a cultural phenomenon (which could be why Tinder is the go-to app for many love-seekers). The app focuses on your location using GPS and you browse photos and bios of potential matches in your area. It uses your Facebook info to create your profile – but don’t worry, none of your Tinder exploits will ever be posted to Facebook.
Using text from the free-form “boxes,” I analyzed whether and how the profiles reflected heteronormative constructions of gender, paying close attention to lexis (word choice) and directness/indexicality. My analysis was guided by the categories suggested by Paap and Raybeck (2005) and Jagger (1998), including “representations of self and other,” social and physical categories, resources (occupational, cultural, educational, economic, and various commodity resources such as valuable objects), and “masculine” or “feminine” personality attributes. I also looked for differences and similarities between users’ responses by comparing how different people answered the same prompt.
Online dating is not just for the younger set thanks to the greying of the internet. According to the Pew Internet and American Life Project, from 2005 to 2008, the largest jump in adoption of Internet usage was by users ages 70 and older. Internet penetration among people ages 70 to 74 increased by 19 percentage points from 2005 to 2008 and for people 75 +, the increase was 10 percentage points.  All this is good news for companies that recognize and cater to the growing number of single older adults and seniors using the internet to find love and friendship.
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