dating site

SilverSingles is tailored to "mature, well-rounded men and women" above the age of 50. It debuted in 2001 as PrimeSingles.net, changed its name to Single Seniors Meet in 2009 and has been SilverSingles since 2011. SilverSingles is tailored towards long-term committed relationships for their members' golden years. The site is very clear and easy to navigate, making it a approachable for older adults who might not get online as much. 
That sort of massive following is a selling point in itself, but Plenty Of Fish has more going for it than just pure size. It’s something of a “lite” version of other dating apps, and includes Tinder’s swiping mechanics, and a Happn-style ability to see matches near to you. It does have its own little twists on the formula — POF’s “Spark” system allows users to quote any part of their amour’s profile, making icebreakers that much easier.
This app lets you scroll through potential matches for as long as you’d like. It displays a person's photo, age, name, physical attributes and intention right up front, but lacks any kind of personalization or biography. You’ve got to show your personality through photos alone. There are also mixers within the app that divide users up by their interests and intentions, like healthy lifestyles, serious relationships only or even “cute pets.” Once you join a mixer you can scroll through message boards and see what other users are talking about or trade information to keep chatting.
Now has a messaging feature, but chats are only visible for two hours if you and another user stop talking. You get four free access keys when you sign up, which increase your chances of meeting new people. If you want more, they're available for purchase. When you buy a Gold Key, you get unlimited access to all of the app's premium features for 60 hours.
OkCupid, how you confuse me. I have friends who've met spouses through OkCupid. My last serious relationship came from OkCupid. In fact, I've been on OkCupid, on and off, for roughly the last 11 years. Profiles are much more in-depth than most dating sites, and if you answer a seemingly endless series of questions, they will spit out a reasonable Match/Enemy percentage ratio on profiles to help you gauge compatibility.
Changes in the last year have made OkCupid a bit more like Tinder, focusing more on swiping and eliminating the ability to message a user without matching with them first. You can still send a message -- it just won't show up in the recipient's inbox unless you match. Because who doesn't enjoy sending a thoughtful message to someone who might never see it? However, OkCupid has pointed out that these changes did help lower the number of offensive messages users received, which might be a worthwhile trade-off.

‘Asking your date questions not only shows that you’re interested in what they have to say but it also allows you to get to know them, which is what a first date is all about! Don’t stick to small talk. More intimate questions about your date’s hopes, dreams and passions will help you forge a closer connection – and it’s a lot more interesting than talking about the weather.’
How does it work? A similar taste in music can be a great indicator as to whether you’re compatible with someone, so the fine folks behind Tastebuds have struck gold with their music-based online dating site. Getting started is dead simple: pick three artists or bands that you’re interested in, the gender you’re looking to date and press ‘go’. It’s a fun and relaxed site, which can introduce you to new music, concert buddies and potentially even your own real-life Caleb Followill.
Nerve.com is a site based in the United States, with geographic search features and an international site readership. Founded in 1997, Nerve is not solely a dating site, but more of a content hub in the form of “a website and eMag dedicated to sex, relationships, and culture” (Empson, 2012). Because Nerve had an emphasis on content with the dating section as a subsection, it was (and is still) more likely to be attracting users who are part of the young, progressive, “hip” audience that the site seems to target for its blogs and advice columns. Although there were many other dating sites available, one reason I chose Nerve as the source for my sample was its target audience, members of which seemed likely to be more Internet-savvy than average. Another reason was that at the time these examples were collected in 2007, Nerve’s profile format allowed a degree of expressive freedom that was uncommon. The amount of free-form text that users were prompted to supply provided enough material for a substantive analysis.

Hinge positions itself as the "relationship app", claiming that three out of four first dates set up through the app lead to second dates, and that it is the number one mobile-first dating app mentioned in the New York Times Wedding section. And with that bold pitch you should be fairly confident that people you meet on the app will be looking for something serious.
Hinge is kind of like Tinder. OK, it’s a lot like Tinder — but with a few key differences that make it better. Interface-wise, it looks like Tinder’s younger sister. But function-wise, it relies more on your Facebook friends to make connections for you. Hinge connects you through friends-of-friends-of-friends and shows you not just the people you have in common, but all the interests you have in common. It does this by having you answer a bunch of questions through a Tinder-like interface. Have you been to Berlin? Swipe right. Don’t play croquet? Swipe left. This makes answering questions far easier and less time-consuming, not to mention more fun. The questions themselves aren’t as asinine as those in some other dating apps, and give you a better sense of someone than 500 characters might.
When you pay for a premium membership, you can see different users who have liked your profile. Also, you can get some of the same features you can with a paid Tinder account, such as having an unlimited number of swipes and having the ability to change your location. You can also see who is currently online and you can get read receipts on messages that you send.

ChristianCupid.com: I can’t help but add the Cupid-based Christian site, ChristianCupid.com, because it has such a pretty interface. I have had so much success with the Cupid-based sites that I am probably one of the company’s biggest advocates. I found love on a Cupid Media site (BrazilCupid.com). With that said, I would use this site as a third option if your two options above don’t give you the results you were looking for.


Clover is a nice, clean, easy-to-use app with plenty of Australian users and a couple of interesting features. Like Tinder you get to look at a list of possible matches that you say yes or no to. But unlike Tinder you can filter your matches based on things like their relationship intention, interests, occupation and religion. Once you find someone you're interested in you can like them, message them or play twenty questions to find out how similar or different you are. Clover also offers on-demand dating which basically allows people to shortcut the small talk and go straight to setting up a meeting. The app is free but setting up a search filter on user profiles requires the premium version which starts from $29.99 per month.
Before we get started, our blanket recommendation for everyone is to find the apps with a larger user base in your area. That helps ensure you get plenty of matches, and by extension, a higher chance of finding someone actually compatible with you. If you try one of the niche apps and don’t get results after a week or two, we recommend ditching it entirely for a more popular option. If all else fails, our best recommendation is Tinder because, as stated, it’s popular everywhere. Good luck!
While this is the only app of its kind we know if right now, we can only assume other high tech fridges will be coming out with their own versions soon. Samsung's website details the many ways in which the kinds of food you have speak volumes about your personality. A fridge full of protein shakes and fruits, for example, speaks to a healthy lifestyle. Someone with a lot of dairy products and containers full of sweets might really enjoy baking. These are aspects of a person’s life important when it comes to finding a long term partner, but we have to admit, it might be a little weird looking through fridges. Let us know how it goes.
Over the past 15 to 20 years, Internet-based dating has become a tool utilized by increasing numbers of “singles” in their search for romantic partners. Unlike the print personals of the past, which were restricted in form due to the space constraints of paper publications such as newspapers, online dating advertisements—or indeed, profiles, as they have become—are enabled by the more flexible medium of the Internet. As such, they have the capacity to support large amounts of text through which users can construct more nuanced versions of their “presenting selves” (Goffman, 1959). Online dating sites, like many other Internet-based social media tools, operate through a mode of communication that requires users to develop a new and complex literacy. This literacy of self-presentation reinforces and re-inscribes the tendency toward promotionalism that permeates contemporary economic, cultural, and social life.
What it'll cost you:  A basic account is always free. But there are some paid extras you can enjoy if you want a more premium experience. If you pay for the A-List membership, you can cut out the ads, you get more search options like body type and attractiveness, you can see everyone who likes you, and you can see who reads your messages, among other useful things. 

The app does an incredibly good job at collecting feedback from singles, using it  to help increase your rate of success. Members are given a report card-style dashboard that shows them why users liked or passed on their profile, down to the specific reason, such as low-quality profile pictures, as well as offering ways to improve their likelihood of getting “liked.” For any online dater, this dashboard alone is a good (and free) tool to gauge how their profile is performing compared to others.
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